Co-curating The Year That Made Antarctica

The Polar Museum tested out co-curation for their recent exhibition – the varied team ensured that a wide cast of characters made an appearance in ‘The Year That Made Antarctica’.

There’s just one month left to run of our current exhibition at the Polar Museum: The Year That Made Antarctica – People, Politics and the International Geophysical Year (IGY). Set against the backdrop of the Cold War, the exhibition explores the diplomatic and logistical challenges of setting up a science programme in one of the World’s most remote places. The year not only produced scientific results that are still important for us today as we study our changing planet, it also broke new ground in establishing the entire Antarctic continent as a place reserved for peaceful and scientific activity.

Click here to keep reading on the University of Cambridge Museums blog…

The Radiophonic Workshop at the Science Museum

For young viewers of early Dr. Who, the most famous track created by The Radiophonic Workshop will always be inextricably linked with memories of peeking out at Cybermen from behind their sofa. The pulsing rhythms of Delia Derbyshire’s theme tune went on to represent the beginnings of The Workshop’s unique form of early electronica. This pioneering music studio had been set up by a group of BBC employees as demand had grown for innovative synthetic music and sounds for radio and television. Through developing these sounds The Workshop would go on to inspire musicians from across the world and create a new genre of synthetic soundscapes.

Continue reading on the Science Museum’s website…

Frozen in time?

This blog post was written following the Objects in Motion conference, held at CRASSH, University of Cambridge.

We often imagine that museum objects end their lives when they enter a collection. At the Objects in Motion conference, there was much discussion over whether museum collections are alive, dead, or just resting. Often museum objects have been through a long journey – from their native setting or perhaps another kind of a life to being stripped of their context, given a label and an identification number and placed reverently in a cool dark store to await an audience. An audience of researchers perhaps, arriving one at a time to eagerly inspect a particular quality of that object, or maybe an audience of millions when the object finds itself on display in a large national museum. Whichever of those is true, the question remains: are those objects alive?

13th-century wooden Tibetan book cover depicting the Buddha Shakyamuni on the night of his enlightenment. Credit: Wikimedia / Walters Art Museum.

Continue reading at the Objects in Motion blog